Wednesday, October 05, 2011

Chris Christie – Media Shock at Decision to Bow out Of 2012 GOP Race – His Decision Carries More Weight than Most Consider


New Jersey Governor Chris Christie - from the website: Save Jersey.com

When one considers the special election for Governor of New Jersey in 2009, it was not so much the knowledge of who Chris Christie might have been (to those living outside New Jersey proper), but the fact that this Republican did the unthinkably impossible – take the lead and become the Governor of one of the bluest states in the nation. That was admirable enough; however, as time went on, and the press conferences began, it was apparent that Chris Christie was no ordinary Northeast Republican, rather a guy who was willing to take on the entire Democrat machine in Jersey, from the Legislature to the Unions. At that time, when one thought of Northeast Republican’s, there appeared a vision of men in suits, women in pearls, holding exclusive barbeques and fundraisers – the country club set. (See Mitt Romney and the perception he just cannot shake.) The general impression given that the party itself is so inconsequential anyone running as a Republican was not really that serious? Then along came some guy in a pickup truck in Massachusetts by the name of Scott Brown. Between Brown and Christie the landscape had changed, and the Typical Republican became hard to define. (Note: this change in the GOP typical candidate appears to have been lost on the media, or the DNC, perhaps in denial, but was clear to those who vote: Republican, Independent and Moderate Democrats.)

Christie had specific appeal, as he managed to do what no other Governor had done, lower taxes in New Jersey, and best the Teachers unions. It’s not that it had not happened before; it just didn’t happen north of the Mason Dixon Line and east of Iowa.
Therefore, many of those who are looking at a field of eight GOP candidates, many of whom are more than capable of taking the helm that that is the U.S. government, looked at Christie as some sort of icon (which he truly is), and tried any way possible to push the man to run for the office of the President. Time and again, ad nauseum, Christie graciously outlined the reasoning as to why he would not take the “bait”. It was big “news”, this candidate that would not leave his job as the Governor of New Jersey, and run for the GOP nomination, as of today there are as many articles on Chris Christie's shocking decision not to run (shock to whom?), as there are of Herman Cain’s poll numbers being equal to Mitt Romney’s!

The New York Times headline best exemplifies the press on Christie ”Opting Out of the Race Christie Says “Now is not my time”. What is missing from the headline: for the umpteenth time Christie says “No”!

The fact that anyone who wants the job of the Presidency, at this stage in history, should have two qualities to this mind, be somewhat off the reservation to begin with, and be as dedicated as Moses leading the Israelites to the Promised Land. The nation is in a state, both physiologically and economically, that even Ronald Reagan may have paused before considering the post. Anyone going in knows that the work will be tough, they will be faced with a dismal economy, a hostile press and a more hostile, although, smaller group of Progressives who will whine and accuse with no end in sight. (That would be the Democrats in both Houses of Congress, assuming those most vocal will still be employed by the people). Restoring the economy is one thing, restoring the credibility of the U.S. abroad will be another, and it may well take both time and someone used to taking criticism from all sides, to do this job.

Christie as Governor of New Jersey is pretty much in the same position, on a state level, and frankly, holding the position, not necessarily for the GOP, rather for the people of New Jersey, may just be as important if not more so at this time that say a run at the White House. To lose New Jersey to the Progressive Democrats would be to give the press and DNC the opportunity to affirm that the tide had changed – regardless of the fact that Christie had and continues to do the impossible. Therefore, holding New Jersey is akin to holding the Alamo, and perhaps more important at this point in the effort to reign in Government and get the nation, state by state, back on track and away from cronyism.

It is easy to admire Chris Christie simply because he is the straight talking Governor of New Jersey, who one must admit, is all that and a slice of bread to any political junkie. He resonates in his press conferences: one moment, yelling at surfers to “Get the Hell off the Beach - You have maximized your tan”, in the best of Jersey dialect and the fury of a leader faced with stupidity (given the threat of a Hurricane – Irene). Moving to a speech less impromptu, at the Reagan library, he delivers what can only described as a stunning speech, full of hope, sprinkled with wit, and, when pressed, (for the umpteenth time to run for the Presidency), humble but not so that he would not be flattered (as he pointed out anyone would).

Christie is where he belongs: fighting the good fight for the taxpayers of New Jersey, and holding the line for Fiscal Conservatives in all fifty states. It’s an important job, this particular Governorship and Christie knows it. Christie also knows the polls, and understands that one of those standing on the GOP debate stage (or another that may join them) will, in all likelihood, be the next President – what better place to be than Govenor of New Jersey? Delivering perhaps for the first time in memory, the State of New Jersey to the GOP? That would appear to be the tougher campaign if one is honest, far more challenging and in future implications, one that would increase the already significant admiration for the Governor exponentially. Who knows, he may be just the ticket in 2020.

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